​​​​How Much Pressure Can You Handle?

Anyone who is connected to the Mid Valley Metro Water System enjoys great static pressure off of our mainlines. We generally have anywhere from 100 to 110 p.s.i. entering into a home and it is a requirement of new homes to have a Pressure Reducing Valve down to approximately 75 psi.


What does this mean to the average homeowner? Most plumbing in homes is rated to a least 200 psi and you can count on good pressure into your showers and appliances. However, your job as homeowner will never be over!  Did you know it is recommended that supply lines ( yes, those little 1/4 inch lines going to toilets and your ice maker, etc!) be replaced every 5 years and check each year for leaks and signs of decay.  Save your 

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Mid Valley Metropolitan District


​​​​​​Leaks and Leak Detection

How many gallons of water can one leaking toilet contribute to a monthly bill? 


The answer is: If the leak is one gallon per minute, the leak will use 1,440 gallons per day or, 43,200 gallons in a 30 day month! 


Mid Valley Metro suggests you check your toilets monthly. This can be accomplished with a few drops of food coloring dropped in the tank at the back of the toilet.Check back in 45 minutes - If you see the color, your toilet is leaking!



The Challenges of Summer and How You Can Help!

Summer is why we live here! The warm weather and low humidity makes our valley one of the most pleasant places in the country to live or visit​. ​Water providers throughout the west however are challenged with a significant increase in water use for  irrigation and general use during the summer months. While some of our newer neighborhoods have access to raw water for irrigation, many early developments do not.  We have to produce more water to provide for the anticipated usage.


Mid Valley Metro has great water sources with 6 major producing wells throughout the valley floor. However with water being a precious commodity throughout the west, we have a responsibility to conserve when we can. You can help!


  • Please ensure your irrigation system is programmed to run at night so the water has the ability to percolate into the soil instead of evaporating in the heat of the day.  
  • ​Check for leaks in your irrigation system mainlines. Leaky valves are common after hard winters! You can check by turning off all domestic water use in your home and flashing a flashlight on your water meter - Two numbers will display on your meter - One is the total amount of water used - The second is the rate of water use. When all domestic water use is off, there should be a rate of "0.00". If you show a number above zero, you have a leak.
  • ​Do not overwater zones. Check to make sure the length of you zones allows for the water to be absorbed and does not run off!
  • ​If you notice a neighbors sprinkler system having a leak or going off at weird time, let them know. We have found many times homeowners are not familiar with their irrigation clocks or may not be home when it goes off! Let them know if you see a problem.

​​These are just a few items to help us preserve our precious commodity. Your assistance is appreciated!